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Advertising Irony

January 5, 2009

What legacy will your brand advertising leave behind if your company undertakes a drastic course change?

This was one of several  pointed ads DHL put out challenging UPS and FedEx.    The economic downturn created an unforeseen turn of events which proved  ironic .  The following passage from a November LA times story  covering layoffs of 9500 pretty well nails it…

Deutsche Post, the Bonn, Germany-based parent of DHL, blamed the move on heavy competition from United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp. as well as severe financial losses stemming from the weak U.S. economy. It follows 5,400 U.S. job cuts the company had made earlier this year and will leave DHL with 3,000 to 4,000 workers in its U.S. express business.

I think this is a cautionary case for agencies and marketing execs everywhere.    Content in the blogosphere lives on,  material that was once edgy may become cliche’ or worse, ironic at a future time.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. January 8, 2009 5:29 pm

    i’m not that familiar with the numbers involved but i suspect DHL today is where Airborne Express was shortly before they were bought out.   that in itself is a bit ironic since it shows that they should have let sleeping dogs lie.

    i liked using DHL, too.   all of my IBM parts came via DHL and the drivers were always courteous and never arrived with smashed packages.

    from an advertising standpoint, it’s never good to directly bring your competition into your campaigns.   it can come back to smack you in the face like a freight train.

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